Avoiding Twitter Burnout: Your Questions, Answered

Image Credit: Tom Fishburne/Marketoonist

Seek or Shout community manager Teresa Dankowski and I recently hosted an Avoiding Twitter Burnout webinar where we discussed ways to make content more lively, find new people to engage with and track your ROI.

We didn’t get to answer all the audience questions during the webinar but we have answered them here. If you have additional questions or comments, add them below!

Q: What is your thinking when deciding to latch onto an existing hashtag or trying to foster a new one?

A:  Like with a lot of things, the answer to this depends on your unique situation and specifically, the hashtag conversation you are thinking about joining. In general, if the hashtag is discussing a very specific news event – especially a controversial one – and you are going to jump in with a product or other pitch, it is best to create a new one. Most of the time,  news-generated hashtags are where people go to share opinions and think of solutions, and they find any other content offensive. If you are thinking about joining a general hashtag – I use #PR & #Marketing a lot – by all means, jump in! The purpose of a hashtag is for people to easily find posts on specific topics & if you have something of value to add – and are not joining the hashtag solely for your own benefit – join in! If you don’t know which hashtag to use, I solve this problem by visiting search.twitter.com. If  people using the hashtag are credible, I know it’s the right one! There also are tools like hashtags.org that do some of the work for you.

Q: Do you think a two-part tweet in order to get your full message across is a good idea? Or does it get lost in translation?
A: 
I personally think it’s more effective to fit your message within the 140 characters allowed. Twitter was designed with brevity in mind, so here are three questions I like to ask myself if I run into problems condensing:

  1. If I can’t effectively fit my brand or company’s message in one tweet, am I sure this is the correct platform for this specific marketing task? Maybe I should use a different social channel, such as Facebook, or a different method, such as direct e-mail marketing?
  2. If I can’t squeeze the facts into one message, maybe I should link to a news article, press release or source for those who want to read more?
  3. If users have to read my message in two separate tweets, and somehow only see or interpret one of those tweets, will my message be confusing, misinterpreted or taken out of context?

The last question is important to consider, if it means your customers and followers getting the right message vs. an incomplete or incorrect message.

Q: How much time during the day do you spend managing the Cision Twitter account?
A: On average, I would say at least 4 hours but during work hours, I am consistently monitoring it. I could spend all day on the site but there are other duties I have (and other social platforms to spend time on!) so I step away from Twitter to work on other tasks, keeping an eye on my monitoring platform the entire time.

Q: What are your thoughts on linking social media accounts?
A: As far as linking content, we do not like to do this. We generally publish all Cision-developed content across each social platform, but will introduce it in a different way. We then share some unique content with each platform’s audience and interact with them. You also mentioned workflow integration and that is something that is essential for any social media team – big or small. We use Cision’s Social Media Dashboard, which is powered by Radian6.

Q: How do I know if the number of followers I have is good?
A:  In short, it’s about quality, not quantity. We will refer you to Nate for this one! Keep in mind that you need to set goals for yourself based on the strategy you have developed. It shouldn’t solely be about the number of followers; you want a well-rounded social media presence that is known for quick response, great client support, thought leadership, or whatever it is you decide to be key for your strategy.

Q: Can you explain “Follow Friday” #FF?
A:
 Sure! Follow Friday has become a widely adopted trend on Twitter, where people recommend other tweeters they think their followers should be following. “For #FF, check out @cision and @SeekOrShout!” could be a typical Friday message.  It’s common for tweeters to recommend friends, people with interesting or industry-specific tweets, or people the tweeter may have recently started following. Participating in Follow Friday can be a great way to broaden your social network and subscribe to new sources of information.

Q: I’m trying to both promote a radio station and offer usable messages. Is there a balance to avoid being too ‘commercial’?
A:
 We think the above cartoon from Tom Fishburne explains it best: the reason you should be on social media and sending out content is to help your audience. What do they want or need? Figure that out and fulfill that need and you’re on the path to becoming an asset to your industry.



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