Marketing and Earned Media Statistics

Brand Relationships

  • Only 23 percent of millennial consumers say they have a relationship with brands, more than half say that they have brand complaints that aren't addressed. (Inc., August 2017)

 

 

Comms Transformation

  • 16 percent of senior communications leaders spend at least one-fifth of their annual budget on measuring, monitoring and understanding the impact of comms programs. That is up from 11 percent in 2017. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 49 percent of senior communications leaders devote at least 10 percent of their annual budget to measurement, a slight uptick from the 47 percent who said so last year. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 63 percent of in-house communications leaders report that comms is part of the marketing function at their brand. While 37 percent indicate that comms is not part of the marketing function. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 61 percent of senior communications leaders say they have data that gives them a strong sense of how many people actually read content.  (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 43 percent of senior communications leaders have data that gives them a strong sense of what people do after they consume the content. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 49 percent of senior communications leaders have data that gives them a strong sense of whether there was any real-world behavior driven from the content. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)

 

 

  • 33 percent of senior communications leaders place media monitoring among their top three most important brand activities; 25 percent did so last year. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 54 percent of senior communications leaders place analytics and reporting among the top three most important activities for brands; 45 percent did so last year. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 54 percent of senior communications leaders deem paying influencers an important part of their influencer strategy; 48 percent said so last year. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • Globally, 68 percent of senior communications leaders make a concerted effort to stay in touch with the media even when there is no current story to be covered. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • Globally, 71 percent of senior communications leaders consider traditional journalists among the most important audiences for their content. (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)

Marketing Communications Challenges

  • 75 percent of brands say identifying the right influencers is their biggest challenge to paid media campaigns. (emarketer, July 2015)
  • 72 percent of marketers rate “Difficulty identifying and engaging with right prospects at the right time” as a problem and barrier toward achieving their marketing objectives. (Cision The Earned Media Opportunity, June 2016)
  • When asked to identify the top three biggest challenges in implementing an earned media strategy, 60 percent of marketing/communications professionals chose identifying and connecting with key influencers, 52 percent chose measuring financial impact of programs/prove ROI and 42 percent chose creating compelling content. (Cision Earned Media Influential in Performance Marketing)
  • When senior marcomms leaders were asked to identify the areas they need to improve upon most in terms of technology and data, “talent” was tied with “tools” as the top answer at 36 percent. In 2017, 41 percent selected “tools” while 32 percent chose “talent.” (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)

 

 

  • 77 percent of senior communications leaders indicate that comms can still do a better job at measuring and proving its impact on business objectives.  (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 73 percent of senior communications leaders deem “aligning metrics to revenue or vital business KPIs” as the most difficult challenge facing comms measurement.  (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • 47 percent of senior communications leaders place competing with paid media for budget among their top three most difficult challenges.  (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)
  • Globally, 51 percent of senior communications leaders placed tightening budgets among their top three most difficult challenges, followed by “inability to measure impact effectively” (50%) and competing with paid media for budget (47%). (PRWeek/Cision 2018 Global Comms Report, November 2018)

Media Relations Statistics

State of Journalism

  • Between 1994 and 2014, newsrooms have shed over 20,000 jobs, representing a 39 percent decline. (Pew Research, June 2016)

 

 

  • The public has not become a key source of information with only 14 percent of journalists saying it was one of their two key sources of information, suggesting U.S. journalists are cautious about using the public for gathering stories. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 39 percent of journalists reported that they use analytics daily to understand the effectiveness of their content, an additional 22 percent do that weekly and a further 19 percent monthly. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 63 percent of journalists in the 18-27 age group agreed that fake news was a serious problem in their area of journalism, while the figure for the 28-45 age group was 49 percent and for the 46-64 age group 52 percent. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)

 

Media Outreach

  • Journalists continue to prefer email as the primary means of contact, with more than 90 percent indicating it as the best way to directly pitch a story idea. (Cision State of the Media Report, March 2017)
  • 58 percent of influencers and journalists said displaying knowledge of past work, interests and beats is what drove them to pursue a story. (Cision State of the Media Report, March 2017)

 

 

  • 82 percent of journalists say PR professionals can improve by researching and understanding their media outlet. (Cision State of the Media Report, March 2017)
  • 72 percent of journalists say PR professionals can improve by tailoring the pitch to suit their beats/coverage. (Cision State of the Media Report, March 2017)

 

Social Media

  • Forty-one and a half percent of journalists, bloggers and influencers chose Facebook as the most valuable channel for audience engagement. (Cision State of the Media Report, March 2017)
  • Social networks are the most used platforms and 42 percent of journalists use five or more types of social media regularly. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Audience interaction is an important activity for many journalists on social media, with 19 percent engaging with their audience via social media every hour and a further 47 percent daily. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Nearly half (48 percent) of journalists feel they could not carry out their work without social media, which is a higher figure than the 37 percent who said the same in 2012. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • In 2012, 83 percent of journalists said they were using social networks for work at least once a week compared to 90 percent in 2017. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 77 percent of journalists said that they used microblogs regularly for their work in 2012, that figure dropped to 67 percent in 2017. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 42 percent of journalists reported that they use more than five types of social media at least once a week for work, 80 percent used more than three kinds of platforms and only five percent worked with only one type of social media. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 73 percent of journalists reported using social media for their work daily, with 31 percent saying that they use the tools for three hours or more a day. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • News, politics and current affairs journalists emerged as the ones spending the longest time on social media with 43 percent staying on the platforms for three hours or longer a day. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • The majority (68 percent) of business and industry specialist journalists use social platforms daily, but only 20 percent of them stayed longer than three or more hours a day. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Younger journalists (those between the age of 18 and 27) were more likely to use social media for three or more hours a day than their older counterparts (53 percent as opposed to 22 percent for those aged between 46 and 64). (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 67 percent of journalists thought that social media was very important for publishing and promoting their work. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)

 

 

 

  • 46 percent of journalists think that social media is very important for monitoring other media/what’s going on. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Social networking and microblogging sites are used more regularly by journalists in 2017 to post comments daily (59 percent) compared to 2012 (47 percent). (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Audience interaction is an important activity for many journalists on social media, with 19 percent engaging with their audience via social media every hour and a further 47 percent daily. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • In 2017, 80 percent of respondents thought that they were more engaged with their audience because of social media. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Many journalists frequently interact with their audience on social with 66 percent reporting they do it daily. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • One in four (25 percent) journalists felt that they relied completely on social media for engagement with their audience. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 47 percent of journalists said they were reliant on social media for engagement with their audience to a large extent. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Only three percent of journalists think that they do not need social media for engagement with their audience. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Full-time employed journalists were more likely to interact with their audience daily or hourly on social media (72 percent) compared to freelance journalists (66 percent). (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Unsurprisingly more than half (57 percent) of journalists stated that social media was the first choice of communication with the public – it affords journalists a unique method of communication with their audience. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 71 percent of journalists agreed that social media has fundamentally changed their role as a journalist, while in 2016 the figure was 65 percent. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • Less than half of journalists agreed that overall social media has had a positive impact on journalism (42 percent agreed, 26 percent disagreed and a relatively high 31 percent was undecided). (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • 57 percent of journalists agreed or strongly agreed that social media was undermining traditional values such as objectivity (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)
  • The majority of journalists also thought (77 percent agreed or strongly agreed) that social media was encouraging journalists to focus on speed rather than analysis. (Cision 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, September 2017)